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Adventure Activity Standards Review 2015

The review process for the following four Adventure Activity Standards is just about complete.  Comments from practitioners, participants and other interested parties were received, evaluated and debated by four Technical Working Groups.  The Technical Working Groups' recommendations were compiled into a Draft Revision and were presented to the Industry Standards Panel for ratification.

The Draft Revised Standards were then made available for a two week final Public Comment period, which concluded on Monday, September 5.

The public submissions are now being considered by the Industry Standards Panel, who will finalise the process and approve the revised Standards for publishing. 



You can still download and read the current Standard/s:

AAS Challenge Ropes Course V2.0 Jan 2013 AAS Challenge Ropes Course V2.0 Jan 2013 (544 KB)

AAS Snorkelling and Wildlife Swims V1.2 Oct 2009 AAS Snorkelling and Wildlife Swims V1.2 Oct 2009 (227 KB)


For further information about the review process, read on...

About the Adventure Activity Standards

Download information flyer

Adventure Activity Standards (AAS) have been developed to reflect common safe practice as identified by the outdoor sector.

They describe the minimum industry requirements and responsibilities for organisations and leaders conducting outdoor adventure activities for commercial and non-commercial groups where the participants are dependent upon the activity provider.

It is in the interests of the outdoor sector to embrace, respect and nurture the Adventure Activity Standards:

  • The AAS are a response to a real need to safeguard participants in group-led activities. 
  • The AAS are a way for outdoor leaders, practitioners and operators to protect themselves from potential litigation, improve the quality of their services and positively differentiate themselves in the marketplace.  
  • The development and implementation of the AAS has enabled the outdoor adventure sector to adopt a self-regulatory model as a preferred alternative to the imposition of additional government safety regulations.

In order to have a real impact on the safety of outdoor adventure activities it is clear that the standards must be acted upon by the maximum number of applicable parties. It will not be sufficient that they exist but are not applied. It may even be an issue that the existence of standards will, if not applied, create additional culpability in the event of incidents, regardless of the voluntary nature of the standards.

The Review Process

An important element of the AAS is a regular review and, where necessary, revision of each Standard to ensure continuing relevance.  Events and circumstances that could lead to particular Standards needing to be reviewed have been termed “triggers”.

These include:

  • Technology – changing capabilities of new equipment, adoption of technologies by new groups and activities, research findings, communications etc.
  • Events – where incidents call into question the relevance or compliance level of particular Standards.
  • Participation trends – where numbers of participants are growing or declining at an observably greater rate than the general adventure sector.
  • Legal / litigation activity – where law and/or regulation impacting the sector changes or there are adverse findings or recommendations handed down concerning adventure activity.
  • Risk levels – where it is perceived that the level of risk associated with an activity has altered.
  • Dissatisfaction – where a party impacted by a standard considers that the standard is not “working”.

Many lessons have been learned from the initial process of developing the Standards and from the subsequent reviews that have been undertaken.  The priority for the current review was to ensure that the review process is inclusive, transparent and focused on delivering standards that are taken up by stakeholders.

The review canvassed comments and suggestions as widely as possible within each activity. These comments were then considered by a Technical Working Committee (TWC).

The primary functions and responsibilities of the TWCs and their members is to:

  • Represent stakeholders in regard to the issues and opportunities surrounding the operation of AASs and provide a range of experience and expert knowledge.
  • Review the existing AASs in light of their experience and consider the input from stakeholders leading to newly drafted AASs for final sign off by the Industry Standards Panel (ISP) and Board of Outdoors WA.
  • Identify the resources for the effective take up of AASs such as available training, information sources and forums.

Leaders, practitioners, operators and other stakeholders within each of the activities under review were invited to nominate to the Technical Working Committee.






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